Thesis and research projects

We are always happy to work with enthusiastic students in projects or for a thesis. Below you will find a list of available oppurtunities. Apart from these, please contact us to discuss other potential topics.

Master thesis: Impact of intraspecific diversity on plant-soil-feedback
Plant-soil-feedbacks (PSF), either mediated by co-occurring species or through a target species itself, can significantly impact plant performance. PSF are even supposed to affect plant invasion processes through various mechanisms. One rarely considered source of PSFs that has just recently gained attention is the contribution of intraspecific diversity.

Contact: Lena Y. Watermann, lwatermann@ecology.uni-kiel.de
Impact of intraspecific diversity on plant-soil-feedback

 

Bachelor-/Master thesis: Local adaptation in Tabaquillo across an altitudinal gradient
Plants inhabiting the high mountain system of the Andes are exposed to multiple stressors. The quality and intensity of stress in these environments varies across an altitudinal gradient. While extreme drought and cattle herbivory dominate the mountain foots, frost and solar radiation intensify towards the summits. The evergreen, endemic tree species Polylepis australis (Tabaquillo) inhabits both extremes of this environmental gradient and should thus exhibit local adaptations. The project aims at investigating whether Polylepis australis populations from low and high altitudinal origins differ in their responses to drought, herbivory, frost and high solar radiation.

Contact: Dr. Karin Schrieber, Email: kschrieber@ecology.uni-kiel.de
Local adaptation in Tabaquillo across an altitudinal gradient

 

Bachelor-/Master thesis: Local adaptation in Sea Rocket across a latitudinal gradient
Terrestrial plants inhabiting coastal ecosystems are exposed to multiple stressors including periodical drought, heat and salinity. The geographic distribution ranges of these plant species can span environmental gradients with an increase in the frequency and intensity of drought, heat and salinity from northern to southern latitudes. The annual, herbaceous plant species Cakile maritima (Sea rocket) is distributed across such environmental gradients and should thus exhibit local adaptations. The project aims at investigating, whether populations of Cakile maritima from Northern and Southern Europe differ in their responses to drought, heat and salinity.

Contact: Dr. Karin Schrieber, Email: kschrieber@ecology.uni-kiel.de
Local adaptation in Sea Rocket across a latitudinal gradient