Thesis and research projects

We are always happy to work with enthusiastic students in projects or for a thesis. Below you will find a list of available oppurtunities. Apart from these, please contact us to discuss other potential topics.

Video Geobotany Projects





 

 

Master Thesis: Functional traits of ash rejuvenation − Evaluation of a reciprocal transplant experiment
Background: One aspect of global change is the rapid spread of pathogens over long distances. This includes the ash dieback disease caused by the ascomycete Hymenoscyphus fraxineus. Since 2019, FraDiv investigates the mechanisms of ash rejuvenation. A reciprocal transplant experiment was established in 10 forest sites.

Contact: Dr. Katharina Mausolf, Email: kmausolf@ecology.uni-kiel.de
Functional traits of ash rejuvenation − Evaluation of a reciprocal transplant experiment

 

Master Thesis: Progression of ash dieback in Schleswig-Holstein
Background: One aspect of global change is the rapid spread of pathogens over long distances. This includes the ash dieback disease caused by the ascomycete Hymenoscyphus fraxineus. The FraDiv project investigates the effects of ash dieback on the biodiversity of ash-rich forests since 2019.

Contact: Dr. Katharina Mausolf, Email: kmausolf@ecology.uni-kiel.de
Progression of ash dieback in Schleswig-Holstein

 

Bachelor-/Master thesis: Does historical exposure to agropastoralism affect current-day invasions?
European plants frequently dominate and spread in managed grasslands around the world. According to the Neolithic Plant Invasion Hypothesis, this is due to the European species long exposure to agropastoralism and consequent adaptation to the related environmental disturbances. In a semi-controlled multispecies experiment, plant groups with different exposure histories will be compared in terms of response to several types and intensities of agropastoral disturbances.

Contact: MSc Ginevra Bellini, Email: gbellini@ecology.uni-kiel.de
Does historical exposure to agropastoralism affect current-day invasions?

 

Master thesis: Local adaptation in Tabaquillo across an altitudinal gradient
Plants inhabiting the high mountain system of the Andes are exposed to multiple stressors. The quality and intensity of stress in these environments varies across an altitudinal gradient. While extreme drought and cattle herbivory dominate the mountain foots, frost and solar radiation intensify towards the summits. The evergreen, endemic tree species Polylepis australis (Tabaquillo) inhabits both extremes of this environmental gradient and should thus exhibit local adaptations. The project aims at investigating whether Polylepis australis populations from low and high altitudinal origins differ in their responses to drought, herbivory, frost and high solar radiation.

Contact: Dr. Karin Schrieber, Email: kschrieber@ecology.uni-kiel.de
Local adaptation in Tabaquillo across an altitudinal gradient